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Voting Equipment

Democracy Suite

Alachua County is proud to use Dominion Voting's Democracy Suite products to design and count the ballots for all of our elections. The system was first used in Alachua County for the High Springs Municipal Election in November of 2015, and was used countywide beginning with the Presidential Preference Primary in March of 2016. More about these products can be found on Dominion's official webpage.

ImageCast Evolution (ICE)Ballot Box

The heart of the voting experience, the ImageCast Evolution (ICE) is an exciting Optical Scan system and the first voting system that combines the counting of ballots with the ballot marking functions of an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant voting system.

This means that all voters in Alachua County are able to vote using the same ballot, cast their vote on the same equipment, and store their selection as one set of results. No voter has to comprise their privacy.



Optical Scan Voting:

Casting your vote on the ICE tabulator is a simple and user friendly process. Simply: insert ballot

  1. Take the ballot provided to you when you check in at your polling place to one of our voting booths.
  2. Mark your selections with the provided marking device privately; simply filling in the oval next to the choice you want to make for each contest.
  3. Put your voted ballot inside of the provided Secrecy Sleeve, leaving an inch or two sticking out of the top.
  4. Take your ballot to the ICE machines near the exit of your polling place and insert the marked ballot into the machine.
  5. Wait to hear the "Ding!" that tells you your ballot has been cast. If you do not hear a ding, the large screen will show you what is happening with your ballot, and if you need to take any additional action. If you have trouble understanding any message on the screen, feel free to ask a poll worker for assistance.
  6. Exit the polling place and enjoy the rest of your day with that great feeling that you know your voice was heard.



ADA Users:

Some voters may worry that they cannot complete the steps above to cast a ballot securely and privately. Not to worry! The Ballot Marking function provides tools that allow a wide range of voter's covered by the ADA to participate in the private voting experience.

Once you have checked in and been given your ballot, simply go directly to the ICE machine and inform the poll worker that you wish to use the ADA Ballot Marking function.

The poll worker will take a moment to prepare the equipment, and ensure that you are comfortable and ready to vote.ADA Voter

You will then insert your blank ballot into the ICE machine, and it will provide you a variety of methods to assist in making your selections.

The ICE offers Audio, Enlarged Text, High Contrast, and even allows the use of a Sip'n'Puff or Paddle selection device if you bring one with you.

Using the provided Handset or your own Sip'n'Puff or Paddles, you will make all your selections, and let the ICE know you are done voting.

The ICE will them mark your ballot with a built in printer, offer you the chance to review the marked ballot, and cast your ballot into the same ballot box as every other vote cast on the equipment.

That's it, and you can enjoy the rest of your day knowing you did your part for democracy.

ImageCast Central (ICC)

ADA Voter

Voter's who elect to Vote by Mail don't need to worry. Their votes are counted beginning around a week before election day. We use our pair of ImageCast Central (ICC) High Speed machines to count all of the Mail Ballots which have been reviewed and approved by the Canvassing Board. The ICC devices keep the votes secret until after 7PM on election night, ensuring that the Vote by Mail results are always among the first to be released to the public.

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Kim A. Barton
Alachua County Supervisor of Elections

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History.—s. 1, ch. 2006-232.